Tuesday, February 27, 2024

The Soccernostalgia Interview-Part 84- A video Interview and blog presentation with Spanish Photographer and former Journalist Mr. Nacho Solana, discussing Club Atlético de Madrid in the first season of the Jesus Gil presidency, 1987/88 season.

 For this interview, I look back at Club Atlético de Madrid in the first season of the Jesus Gil presidency, 1987/88 season.

The Interview will be as a video link companion, while the Blog will be a presentation of the events.

The Interviewee is:

Mr. Nacho Solana

 

Mr. Solana is a Spanish Photographer and former Journalist

 

 

Mr. Solana’s contact info:

https://www.facebook.com/18nachosolana

 

Mr. Nacho Solana


 

Mr. Nacho Solana



My contact information:

on twitter @sp1873 and on facebook under Soccernostalgia.

https://linktr.ee/sp1873

















Club Atlético de Madrid in the first season of the Jesus Gil presidency, 1987/88 season

 

When Spanish Businessman Gregorio Jesús Gil y Gil was elected as Atlético de Madrid President in 1987, despite his already controversial status, no one could foresee the circus that ensued for the next 17 years. This is considering that Atlético de Madrid won the League title and two Copa del Reys (as well getting relegated).

The 54-year-old Gil was already famous for the wrong reasons. He had started out as a Car Dealer before moving into Construction. In 1969, the San Rafael Complex in Segovia, that he built, collapsed, and killed 58 people. It later turned out that the project had been built without any architects, surveyors nor proper plans.

He was fined 400 million Pesetas and sentenced to prison. He spent 18 months in jail before being pardoned by Spain’s ruler, Francisco Franco.

After his release, he was able to continue to expand his business empire.


Photo From: Don Balon-Extra Liga 9192

(Gregorio Jesús Gil y Gil)



Atlético de Madrid President Don Vicente Calderon passed away on March 24, 1987. This necessitated the election of a new President by the Socios.

The matters on the field in that season (1986/87) were disappointing. Two Managers (Vicente Miera and Jesús Martínez Jayo) had already been dismissed with the third Manager of the season, Luis Aragonés, seeing out the season.

In the end the team finished seventh outside of the UEFA Cup zone and lost in the Final of Copa Del Rey to Real Sociedad.

Atlético de Madrid were lagging behind the big two, Real Madrid of the ‘La Quinta del Buitre’ generation at their height and Terry Venables’ Barcelona.

The conditions were ripe for Jesús Gil to challenge for the Presidency of the club with the club nearly 10 million Dollars in debt.

He was vocal about the corruption of the state and the Football League and presented himself as a warrior against this type of corruption.

He said he was tired of seeing Atletico mismanaged for five years and believed he could turn these around.

He was facing three challengers for the Presidency, including a long-time Director of the club, Salvador Santos Campano. Campano had promised to appoint English Manager Ron Atkinson upon his election.

However, Gil came up with a more enticing offer to win the votes of the socios.

Portuguese club FC Porto had just won the Champions Cup, with the young Paulo Futre as their star.

Just days before the election, he hopped on a plane to Milan, where Porto were playing in the Mundialito of clubs. After seven hours of negotiations, Gil got his man. There were reports that he sweetened the deal by also offering Futre a yellow Porsche.

Afterwards, he went to Jacara Disco in Madrid to represent Futre to the socios.


Photo From: France Football, Issue 2159, August 25, 1987

(Paulo Futre)



Futre was what put Gil over the top and he won the election on June 27. He quickly sacked Luis Aragones on June 30th.

In addition, to Futre, he signed several quality players including Brazilian midfielder Alemão (Botafogo), former International central defender Andoni Goikoetxea (Athletic Bilbao), Marcos Alonso (Barcelona), Parra (Real Betis), Eusebio Sacristán and Juan Carlos (both Real Valladolid).


Photo From: France Football, Issue 2159, August 25, 1987

(Ricardo Alemão)



After signing so many players, the Spanish League was worried they would be in debt. However, Gil insisted that he had spent his own money, in which case the League declared that the players were free to walk out if they chose.

He approached former Argentina 1978 World Cup winning Manager Cesar Luis Menotti. The Boca Juniors Manager left his post and arrived in Spain on July 6, 1987, to discuss terms and agreed on the next day. He signed for one year with the option of an extra year.

He also requested and obtained the signing of Roberto López Ufarte from Real Sociedad.

Menotti stated that he was tempted by the challenge and dreamt of winning a European trophy.

His stated aim was to make Atletico a team who can fight on equal terms with Real.

 

Photo From: France Football, Issue 2159, August 25, 1987

(Cesar Luis Menotti and Paulo Futre)



Ahead of the (1987/88) League season, Gil was very much in the news. He declared to the socios that there is a need for spectacle and great players.

He stated he was a liberal dictator in business matters, once a business decided to do something it must be inflexible.

He declared that they were going to be a ‘milestone’ in Spanish Soccer and win everything.

All the hype certainly helped ticket sales, there was a sharp increase in season ticket holders.

Gil would make verbal attacks on Real Madrid President Ramon Mendoza (accusing Real of stealing Hugo Sanchez) as well as his Barcelona counterpart Nunez.

He stated his declarations in the press were a strategy against the monopoly of the coverage in the press regarding the big two.

Gil’s critics accused him of using the club as a steppingstone to further his business ambitions.

 

Photo From: France Football, Issue 2159, August 25, 1987 



Photo From: France Football, Issue 2159, August 25, 1987 



When the season kicked off, Real Madrid were in an irresistible form and won the first eight matches of the season.

Barcelona were struggling that season and this opened the door for other challengers like Atletico.

Menotti’s squad were slowly moving up the table. They faced Real in the 10th Round on November 7th, at the Bernabeu.

Atletico showed its progress by hammering Real Madrid (4-0) away from home to be just behind them in the League standings.

For a moment, it seemed like Gil’s spending would be the catalyst for a title.

However, this was short lived as Real Madrid would pull away and increase their lead.

By the second half of the season, Real Sociedad overtook Atletico Madrid as Real’s closest challengers.


Photo From: Onze, Issue 143, November 1987

(Club Atlético de Madrid squad 1987/88)



Photo From: Onze, Issue 146, February 1988

(Rabah Madjer and Paulo Futre)



Financially, there were difficulties for the club and there were rumors that Futre might be sold to balance the books.

By springtime, Atletico were falling off the pace. When the sides met one another again, Real were the dominant side and defeated Atletico (3-1) away from home,

This was Atletico’s sixth winless match (a run of 3 ties and 3 losses). This was too much for Gil and he sacked Menotti the next day, Monday March 21st.

Gil had sacked his first Manager (or perhaps his second after sacking Aragones upon taking over). In any case, Menotti (or Aragones) would be the first in a long line of managers who would be dismissed by the volatile Gil.

Prior to his sacking, there were reports and rumors that the two were not getting on. It was even reported that Menotti was about to sign for River Plate as Gil was thinking of replacing him with Javier Clemente.

After his sacking, Menotti stated that it had been a mistake to return to Spain and work for a difficult man like Gil.

Menotti was replaced by José Armando Ufarte, who himself was sacked just weeks later on April 13th, to be replaced by Antonio Briones until the end of the season.

Ufarte was dismissed after refusing to cooperate with Jose Maria Maguregui, whom Gil had lined up to manage the side.

There was discontent amongst the players, due to Gil’s abrasive style of leadership. Gil tasked Maguregui to bring problematic players under control or throw them out.

Atletico finished third that season (14 points behind Real Madrid and behind Real Sociedad) and qualified for the UEFA Cup. On that score there had been an improvement, but this was just the beginning of Gil’s turbulent Presidency.

The next 17 years would see more than 100 players and 39 managers come and go.

Upon taking over, Gil had stated that he wanted to make Atletico, a serious, solvent, and respected club………….

 

Photo From: Onze, Issue 143, November 1987

(Cesar Luis Menotti interview)



Photo From: Onze, Issue 143, November 1987

(Cesar Luis Menotti interview)



Photo From: Onze, Issue 143, November 1987

(Cesar Luis Menotti interview)



 

Club Atlético de Madrid (1987/88 season):

 

Goalkeepers:

Abel Resino Gómez (February 2, 1960, Velada) (aged 27-28 years old at the time)

Agustín de Carlos Elduayen (August 4, 1964, San Sebastian) (aged 23 years old at the time)

Ángel Jesús Mejías Rodríguez (March 1, 1959, Tembleque) (aged 33-34 years old at the time)

 

Defenders:

Juan Carlos Arteche Gómez (April 11, 1957, Maliaño, October 13, 2010, Madrid) (aged 30-31 years old at the time)

Andoni Goikoetxea Olaskoaga (August 23, 1956, Alonsotegi) (aged 31 years old at the time)

Pedro Tomás Reñones Crego (August 9, 1960, Compostela) (aged 27 years old at the time)

Sergio Elías Morgado Rodríguez (March 19, 1963, Badajoz) (aged 22-23 years old at the time)

Juan Carlos Rodríguez Moreno (January 19, 1965, Puente Castro) (aged 22-23 years old at the time)

José Armando Lucas Contreras (October 20, 1966, Madrid) (aged 20-21 years old at the time)

Antonio Rivas Martínez (September 13, 1965, Alcázar de San Juan) (aged 21-22 years old at the time)

 

Midfielders:

Jesús Landaburu Sagüillo (January 24, 1955, Guardo) (aged 32-33 years old at the time)

Ricardo Rogério de Brito, Alemão (Brazil) (November 22, 1961, Lavras Brazil) (aged 25-26 years old at the time)

Antonio Joaquín Parra Fernández (June 17, 1961, Seville) (aged 26 years old at the time)

Eusebio Sacristán Mena (April 13, 1964, La Seca) (aged 23-24 years old at the time)

Juan Carlos Aguilera Martín (May 22, 1969, Madrid) (aged 18-19 years old at the time)

Roberto Simón Marina (August 28, 1961, Villanueva de la Serena) (aged 26 years old at the time)

Enrique Ramos González, Quique Ramos (March 7, 1956, Madrid) (aged 31-32 years old at the time)

Enrique Setién Sola, Quique Setién (September 27, 1958, Santander) (aged 29 years old at the time)

Eduardo Cañadas López (May 10, 1970, Madrid) (aged 17-18 years old at the time)

 

Forwards:

Paulo Jorge dos Santos Futre (Portugal) (February 28, 1966, Montijo, Portugal) (aged 21-22 years old at the time)

Julio Salinas Fernández (September 11, 1962, Bilbao) (aged 24-25 years old at the time)

Roberto López Ufarte (April 19, 1958, Fes, Morocco) (aged 29-30 years old at the time)

Marcos Alonso Peña (October 1, 1959, Santander-February 9, 2023, Madrid) (aged 27-28 years old at the time)

Juan Carlos Pedraza Gómez (September 1, 1959, Madrid) (aged 28 years old at the time)

Julián Romero Nieto (February 25, 1969, Madrid) (aged 18-19 years old at the time)

José María Luengo Martos (June 20, 1970, Madrid) (aged 17-18 years old at the time)

 

Coach: César Luis Menotti (Argentina) (November 5, 1938, Rosario, Argentina) (aged 48-49 years old at the time) (Sacked March 21, 1988)

José Armando Ufarte Ventoso (May 17, 1941, Ponteverda) (aged 46-47 years old at the time) (sacked April 13)

Antonio Briones Yacobi (July 17, 1939, Mabella)

 

Team Captain: Juan Carlos Arteche Gómez 

Official Kit Supplier/Designer: Puma

Shirt Sponsor: Mita

 

 

Transfer Activity:

 

Arrivals:

Paulo Jorge dos Santos Futre (FC Porto / Portugal)

Ricardo Rogério de Brito, Alemão (Botafogo de Futebol e Regatas / Brazil)

Andoni Goikoetxea Olaskoaga (Athletic Bilbao)

Roberto López Ufarte (Real Sociedad)

Marcos Alonso Peña (Barcelona)

Eusebio Sacristán Mena (Real Valladolid)

Juan Carlos Rodríguez Moreno (Real Valladolid)

Antonio Joaquín Parra Fernández (Real Betis)

Juan Carlos Pedraza Gómez (Cadiz)

 

Departures:

Jorge Da Silva (River Plate / Argentina)

Miguel Ángel Ruiz García (Malaga)

Julio Prieto Martín (Celta Vigo)

Pedro Uralde Hernáez (Athletic Bilbao)

Rodolfo Dapena Dapena (Celta Vigo)

Francisco ‘Paco’ Llorente Gento (Real Madrid)

Rubén Bilbao Barruetabeña (Real Valladolid)

Juan José Rubio Jiménez (Sabbadel)

Clemente Villaverde Huelga (Malaga)

Ricardo Ortega Mínguez (Tenerife)


Photo From: Don Balon - Apendice Extra Liga Don Balon-Extra Liga 8788

(Club Atlético de Madrid squad 1987/88)


Photo From: Don Balon - Apendice Extra Liga Don Balon-Extra Liga 8788

(Club Atlético de Madrid squad 1987/88)



 

Photo From: Panini Spain 87/88

(Atlético de Madrid squad 1987/88)


Sources:

World Soccer, August 1987

World Soccer, September 1987

World Soccer, October 1987

World Soccer, November 1987

World Soccer, December 1987

World Soccer, February 1988

World Soccer, March 1988

World Soccer, April 1988

World Soccer, May 1988

World Soccer, June 1988

World Soccer, July 1988

Four Four Two, Issue 120, August 2004

France Football, Issue 2159, August 25, 1987

Onze, Issue 143, November 1987

Soccer America, Vol. 33, No. 8, Issue 823, August 20, 1987 



Sunday, February 25, 2024

The Soccernostalgia Interview- Part 83-A video Interview and blog presentation with English Author Mr. Robert Fielder discussing the Historical Brazil v. Italy World Cup Second Round Match on July 5, 1982.

 For this interview, I look back at the Historical Brazil v. Italy World Cup Second Round Match on July 5, 1982

.

The Interview will be as a video link companion, while the Blog will be a presentation of the events.

The Interviewee is:

Robert Fielder


Mr. Fielder is the Author of ‘The Complete History of the World Cup’ (2014) and ‘The Complete History of the European Championship’ (2016).


Mr. Fielder’s contact info:

twitter: @ademir2z

Book links: 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Complete-History-European-Championship-ebook/dp/B01ET46ZO2?ie=UTF8&*Version

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Complete-History-World-Cup-ebook/dp/B00K9URA7M/ref=sr_1_2?qid=1652731249&refinements=p_27%3ARobert+Fielder&s=digital-text&sr=1-2&text=Robert+Fielder

 

 

My contact information:

on twitter @sp1873 and on facebook under Soccernostalgia.

https://linktr.ee/sp1873













July 5, 1982-Brazil v. Italy-World Cup Second Round Match at the Sarria

 

When discussing classic World Cup matches, chances are the 1982 clash between Brazil and Italy is often referenced amongst Historians and fans.

It was a dramatic match that was end to end action from the start to finish.

It was the artistry and ‘Jogo Bonito’ of Brazil against the reawakening of Italy.

It was the rebirth and redemption of Paolo Rossi, back after a two-year suspension from the ‘Totonero’ Scandal.

It was also the triumph of Italy’s 40-year goalkeeper and captain Dino Zoff, so much under criticism for letting in two long-range shots against the same opponents in 1978.

It was a battle between two managers, who always stuck to their principles.

It was the end of the road for the Brazilian artists who had captivated the World up to that point and the reference point where Italy got the confidence to become World Cup Champions.


Photo From: Azzurri, Storia della Nazionale di calcio tre volte campioni del Mondo, 1910-1983

(July 5, 1982, World Cup, Italy 3-Brazil 2)



 

Before all that we must discuss the context leading up to this match.

Telê Santana’s Brazil had delighted the World with their attacking play in this 1982 World Cup in Spain. They had defeated the Soviet Union, Scotland and New Zealand, scoring ten goals along the way. Zico, Socrates, Eder, Cerezo, Junior and the Serie A based Falcão were household names by now if they already weren’t.

At this point, it seemed like they were destined to win this Word Cup.

 

In contrast, all was not rosy in the Italian camp. They had just barely squeaked by in the first round.

They had started with a scoreless tie against Poland and followed it up with (1-1) ties against both Peru and Cameroon. They only advanced by the virtue of having scored one more goal than Cameroon.

Paolo Rossi on whom Bearzot had gambled seemed out of sorts, just like the rest of the team.

Bearzot made one change to his standard lineup, by the third match against Cameroon. Giampiero Marini lost his place at the expense of his clubmate Gabriel Oriali.

Another turning was the decision to boycott the media after this first round (‘Silenzio Stampa’). The Italian Press had voiced disapproval over the bonus payments the team was to receive after such poor displays in the first three matches.

Whether these two changes were the catalyst is anyone’s guess, but Italy were transformed in this second round.

The two teams were paired along with Argentina in this second group phase.

Italy finally came to life and defeated Argentina (2-1), as did Brazil with a more convincing score (3-1).


Photo From: France Football, Issue 1892, July 13, 1982

(July 5, 1982, World Cup, Italy 3-Brazil 2)



 

Therefore, as the teams faced one another on July 5th, 1982, at Barcelona’s Estadio Sarria, all Brazil had to do was to tie the match to advance, while Italy had to win.

Both teams were unchanged from their previous match, as the managers had settled on their ideal lineups.

Falcão was facing his AS Roma teammate Bruno Conti and both would be legends after this Tournament.

Bearzot assigned Gentile to mark Zico and Collovati was tasked to handle Serginho.

It took only 8 minutes for Paolo Rossi to break his duck and start his personal resurrection.

On the right side, Conti sent a long cross to the left wing to Cabrini. He crossed and Rossi headed Italy’s opener.

Brazil had already fallen behind against the Soviets and Scotland, therefore, panic had not set in.

It only took a few minutes for them to level the score. In the 12th minute, Zico sent Socrates through on the right side and he shot from a narrow angle past Zoff and his near post.

Undeterred, the Italians pushed on to find a winner.

In the 25th minute, Rossi took advantage of sloppy pass by Cerezo to rob the ball and advance and score.

This was the first time Brazil had conceded two goals in this Tournament. For the first time, there was worry amongst the Brazilian faithful.

Yet, they were confident in their philosophy of open play and more than an hour still remained.

In the 34th minute, before even halftime, Italy were forced to make a change. Central defender Fulvio Collovati was injured after a collision with Serginho. Inter’s 18-year-old defender Giuseppe Bergomi replaced him.

Italy’s right back Claudio Gentile also made his mark in this match. Diego Maradona was the victim of his rough treatment, in their previous match vs. Argentina. Equally, Brazil’s most potent force Zico would face his attention. In fact, an indelible image of this match, was Zico’s ripped shirt from continuous pulling by Gentile.

In fact, Gentile ripped the shirt while Zico was in the penalty box, but the offside call had already been made.


Photo From: L’Equipe-La Coupe Du Monde, Volume 2, 1974-1998

(July 5, 1982, World Cup, Italy 3-Brazil 2)



Photo From: L’Equipe-La Coupe Du Monde, Volume 2, 1974-1998

(July 5, 1982, World Cup, Italy 3-Brazil 2)



 

As the Second half began, Italy were in the driver’s seat as Brazil were facing elimination.

Italy could have extended their lead in the 51st minute, when Luiznho fouled Rossi in the box, following a pass from Antognoni. However, the referee waved off the appeals and the match went on.

Minutes later, in the 58th minute, Grazaini’s crossed for Rossi, who shot wide. It was one of the easiest chances of the Tournament and could have been costly as Brazil tied the match shortly afterwards.

In the 68th minute, from the left side Junior drifted to the center and passed to Falcão on the right side. He drifted to the middle and struck with a shot from outside of the box.

It seemed the hard part for Brazil was done and they could look forward to the semifinals.

Immediately after this, Santana took off the disappointing Serginho and sent on Paulo Isidoro and Socrates was pushed upfront.

Brazil continued to attack instead of defending the tie and their defense was left vulnerable.

The Italians continued their attacks and were rewarded in the 74th minute. Conti’s corner from the right side was headed out by Socrates, Tardelli volleyed at the edge of the box and Rossi scored on the line.


Photo From: Calcio 2000, Issue 7, April 1998

(Diagram of Paolo Rossi’s third goal, July 5, 1982, World Cup, Italy 3-Brazil 2)




Photo From: Onze, Issue 79, July 1982

(July 5, 1982, World Cup, Italy 3-Brazil 2)



Photo From: Onze, Issue 79, July 1982

(July 5, 1982, World Cup, Italy 3-Brazil 2)



Right after this, Tardelli asked to be replaced (perhaps he had suffered a knock) and Bearzot sent on Marini.

Brazil went about attacking in search of a third equalizer in a match that was already a classic.

Socrates scored a goal in the latter stages of the match that was ruled out as offside.

In the 88th minute, Italy thought they had scored their fourth goal, but Antognoni’s goal was disallowed for offside.

Dino Zoff had already made many saves in this match and would come to the rescue of Italy in the closing stages.

He saved a header from Oscar right on the line and then quickly pushed a curling corner from Eder.

It was over and Italy had won to advance to the semifinals.

The poor performances of the first round were forgotten, and Rossi had repaid Bearzot’s faith in him.

As far as Brazil, the dream had ended in tears. Naturally, there were scapegoats, the Brazilian defense, most notably its goalkeeper Valdir Peres and Serginho upfront.

Santana later admitted, he could have used defensive tactics in this match, but it was not the Brazilian nor his way.


Photo From: Mondial, New Series, Hors Serie 16, 1982

(July 5, 1982, World Cup, Italy 3-Brazil 2)



He said, “players should have the Freedom to play. Creativity is the most important thing.”

He added that both teams were balanced and attacked well and were on the top of their form, but Brazil made mistakes and Italy took advantage.

He acknowledged that he knew Rossi was a great player but chose against man-to-man marking him.

He was convinced Brazil were better than in their previous match against Argentina.

He felt he had a record of success and the team had played well in Spain. He was unsure of his immediate future, perhaps to continue at club level.

He thanked the world and the Press for receiving his team warmly, and the entire room applauded.

Apparently, following his post-match press conference, the officials and the Press were in tears.

Despite their elimination and loss in this match, their memory lives on to this day.

There was no greater testament of the impression they left that soon afterwards many of this team ended up in the Serie A.

This match will live on forever and will be discussed for generations to come. Brazil lost, but Football won on that day.

 

Photo From: Magazine Source Unknown

(Brazil squad, July 5, 1982, World Cup, Italy 3-Brazil 2)



Photo From: Magazine Source Unknown

(Italy squad, July 5, 1982, World Cup, Italy 3-Brazil 2)



Photo From: Magazine Source Unknown

(Italy squad, July 5, 1982, World Cup, Italy 3-Brazil 2)



 

Photo From: World Soccer, August 1982

(July 5, 1982, World Cup, Italy 3-Brazil 2)


Date: July 5, 1982

Competition: FIFA World Cup-Second Round, Group 3

Result: Italy 3-Brazil 2

Venue: Barcelona, Estadio Sarria, Spain

Attendance: 44,000

Referee: Abraham Klein (Israel)

Linesmen: Bogdan Dotchev (Bulgaria), Sun Cham Tan (Hong Kong)

Kick-off time: 17:15

Goalscorers:

(Italy): Paolo Rossi 8, 25, 74

(Brazil): Sócrates Brasileiro Sampaio de Souza Vieira de Oliveira 12, Paulo Roberto Falcão 68

Summary of goals:

1:0 (8th minute, Italy): Cabrini’s cross from the left side was headed in by Rossi.

1:1 (12th minute, Brazil): Zico sent Socrates through on the right side who shot past Zoff on his near post.

2:1 (25th minute, Italy): Rossi intercepted Cerezo’s mis-pass and advanced to score.

2:2 (68th minute, Brazil): From the left side Junior drifts to the center and passed to Falcao on the right side, he drifted to the center and struck with a shot from outside of the box.

3:2 (74th minute, Italy): Conti’s corner from the side was headed out by Socrates, Tardelli volleyed at the edge of the box and Rossi scored from close range.

Lineups:

Italy:

1- Dino Zoff (Juventus Football Club-Torino)

6-Claudio Gentile (Juventus Football Club-Torino)

4-Antonio Cabrini (Juventus Football Club-Torino)

13-Gabriele Oriali (Internazionale Football Club- Milano) 

5-Fulvio Collovati (Associazione Calcio Milan) (3-Giuseppe Bergomi (Internazionale Football Club- Milano) 34)

7-Gaetano Scirea (Juventus Football Club-Torino)

16-Bruno Conti (Associazione Sportiva Roma) 

14-Marco Tardelli (Juventus Football Club-Torino) (11- Giampiero Marini (Internazionale Football Club- Milano) 75)

20-Paolo Rossi (Juventus Football Club-Torino)

9-Giancarlo Antognoni (Associazione Calcio Fiorentina-Firenze)

19-Francesco Graziani (Associazione Calcio Fiorentina-Firenze)

 

Coach: Enzo Bearzot

Booked: Claudio Gentile 13 (foul on Zico), Gabriele Oriali 78 (foul on Eder)

Other Substitutes:

12-Ivano Bordon (Internazionale Football Club- Milano)  

15-Franco Causio (Udinese Calcio- Udine)

18-Alessandro Altobelli (Internazionale Football Club- Milano) 

 

Team Captain: Dino Zoff

Official Kit Supplier/Designer: Le Coq Sportif

Uniform Colors: Blue Shirts, White Shorts, Blue Socks

Note:

1- Giancarlo Antognoni scored a late goal which was disallowed for offside in the 88th minute.

 

Brazil:

1- Valdir de Arruda Peres ‘Waldir Peres’ (São Paulo Futebol Clube- São Paulo)
2-José ‘Leandro’ de Souza Ferreira (Clube de Regatas Flamengo- Rio de Janeiro)  
3-José ‘Oscar’ Bernardi (São Paulo Futebol Clube- São Paulo)
4-Luiz Carlos FerreiraLuizinho’ (Clube Atlético Mineiro- Belo Horizonte)
6-
Leovegildo Lins GamaJúnior(Clube de Regatas Flamengo- Rio de Janeiro)      
5- Antonio Carlos ‘Toninho Cerezo’ (Clube Atlético Mineiro- Belo Horizonte) 
15- Paulo Roberto Falcão (Associazione Sportiva Roma / Italy)
8-Sócrates
Brasileiro Sampaio de Souza Vieira de Oliveira (Sport Club Corinthians Paulista- São Paulo)
10-
Artur Antunes Coimbra Zico (Clube de Regatas Flamengo- Rio de Janeiro)
9-
Sérgio BernardinoSerginho Chualapa’ (São Paulo Futebol Clube- São Paulo) (7-’Paulo Isidoro’ de Jesus (Grêmio Foot-Ball Porto Alegrense) 69)
11-Éder
Aleixo de Assis (Clube Atlético Mineiro- Belo Horizonte)  

 

Coach: Telê Santana da Silva

Other Substitutes:

12-‘Paulo Sérgio’ de Oliveira Lima (Botafogo de Futebol e Regatas- Rio de Janeiro)

13-’Edevaldode Freitas (Sport Club Internacional- Porto Alegre)

14- Alcides Fonseca JuniorJuninho‘(Associação Atlética Ponte Preta- São Paulo)

19- Carlos ‘Renato’ Frederico (São Paulo Futebol Clube- São Paulo)

 

Team Captain: Sócrates Brasileiro Sampaio de Souza Vieira de Oliveira

Official Kit Supplier/Designer: Topper

Uniform Colors: Yellow Shirts, Blue Shorts, White Socks

Note:

1-Final cap for Valdir de Arruda Peres ‘Waldir Peres’ (28/0) (1975-1982).

2-Final cap for Sérgio BernardinoSerginho Chualapa’ (20/7) (1979-1982).

3-Zico’s jersey was ripped by Claudio Gentile.

4-Socrates scored a goal that was ruled offside in the latter stages of the match.

 

Sources:

Azzurri, Storia della Nazionale di calcio tre volte campioni del Mondo, 1910-1983

Calcio 2000, Issue 7, April 1998

L’Equipe-La Coupe Du Monde, Volume 2, 1974-1998

Onze, Issue 79, July 1982

Spain '82, The Winning of the World Cup, Authors Phil Soar and Richard Widdows

World Soccer, August 1982 


Photo From: Calcio 2000, Issue 7, April 1998

(Italy players)




Photo From: Guerin Sportivo, No 28 (396), July 14-20, 1982

(July 5, 1982, World Cup, Italy 3-Brazil 2)



Photo From: Guerin Sportivo, No 28 (396), July 14-20, 1982

(July 5, 1982, World Cup, Italy 3-Brazil 2)



Photo From: Guerin Sportivo, No 28 (396), July 14-20, 1982

(July 5, 1982, World Cup, Italy 3-Brazil 2)



Photo From: Guerin Sportivo, No 28 (396), July 14-20, 1982

(July 5, 1982, World Cup, Italy 3-Brazil 2)



Photo From: Guerin Sportivo, No 28 (396), July 14-20, 1982

(July 5, 1982, World Cup, Italy 3-Brazil 2)



Photo From: Guerin Sportivo, No 28 (396), July 14-20, 1982

(July 5, 1982, World Cup, Italy 3-Brazil 2)



Photo From: Guerin Sportivo, No 28 (396), July 14-20, 1982

(July 5, 1982, World Cup, Italy 3-Brazil 2)



Photo From: Spain '82, The Winning of the World Cup, Authors Phil Soar and Richard Widdows

(July 5, 1982, World Cup, Italy 3-Brazil 2)



Photo From: Spain '82, The Winning of the World Cup, Authors Phil Soar and Richard Widdows

(July 5, 1982, World Cup, Italy 3-Brazil 2)



Photo From: Spain '82, The Winning of the World Cup, Authors Phil Soar and Richard Widdows

(July 5, 1982, World Cup, Italy 3-Brazil 2)



Photo From: Placar, Issue 633, July 9, 1982

(July 5, 1982, World Cup, Italy 3-Brazil 2)



Photo From: Placar, Issue 633, July 9, 1982

(July 5, 1982, World Cup, Italy 3-Brazil 2)



Photo From: Placar, Issue 633, July 9, 1982

(July 5, 1982, World Cup, Italy 3-Brazil 2)



Photo From: Placar, Issue 633, July 9, 1982

(July 5, 1982, World Cup, Italy 3-Brazil 2)



Photo From: Placar, Issue 633, July 9, 1982

(July 5, 1982, World Cup, Italy 3-Brazil 2)