Sunday, July 5, 2015

New Addition: The Beautiful Game on Celluloid, Part one

A new addition about Soccer related films
Spoiler Alert: I assume most people have already seen these films, as a result I discuss the plot as much as I can. I will not try to go into every detail but generalize as much as possible.


Film:   Escape to Victory (1981)
The problem with Soccer related movies (or any sport for that matter) is that they are cliché ridden. The last second goal, overturning a seemingly lost deficit, the unsung hero who makes the crucial play, etc..
‘Escape To Victory’ (titled ‘Victory’ in USA) has some of those elements.
The movie was directed by legendary Hollywood director John Huston and filmed on location in Budapest, Hungary.

Photo From: Mondial, new series, issue 19, October 1981
(Pele and John Huston)

The stars of the film are Sylvester Stallone, Michael Caine and Max Von Sydow.
It also includes then current and recently retired players such as Pele, Bobby Moore, Osvaldo Ardiles, John Wark, Paul van Himst and Kazimierz Deyna.
The film is set during World War II in a German Prison Camp for Allied Prisoners of War.
Max von Sydow plays a German Officer and Soccer fan, who recognizes Michael Caine’s character, who was a former English Professional.
He organizes a match between the Germans and the prisoners that his superiors want to use as a propaganda tool.
John Colby (Michael Caine) acts as the Player Manager of the Allies.
The most talented player of the team is naturally Pele, who plays Trinidad and Tobago National.

Photo From: Mondial, new series, issue 19, October 1981
(Pele in the POW camp)

Stallone is an American POW (Robert Hatch) who has been in contact with the French Resistance to plan an escape attempt for the team. Though he has no experience in playing soccer, he convinces the manager to be in the team as his presence is crucial for the escape. As a result he becomes the team’s goalkeeper.
The French resistance are planning to tunnel to the players locker room to help them escape during the halftime of the match with the Germans.
Onto the big match at Paris’ Stade Colombes, predictably the Germans with the complicity of the referee built up a 4-1 halftime lead and clobber Pele’s character (shades of Portugal 1966).

Photo From: Onze, Issue 57, September 1980
(Pele during the match with the Germans)

At halftime, the Resistance has tunneled in and are ready to rescue the players. However, the players want to remain and win the match. They try to convince Hatch (Stallone), who is the most reluctant. Naturally, he comes back and plays the second half along with the rest of the team.
The Allies reduce the deficit and tie up the match with the most dramatic scene of the film (or the most predictable/unbelievable, your preference), when Pele with a scissor kick ties up the match (shown in slow motion and different angles).
At this moment, Max Von Sydow’s character refuses to follow the party line and in admiration stands up and claps.
The stage is set for the final dramatic act, when the Germans are awarded a penalty kick (naturally awarded under dubious circumstances).
Hatch (Stallone) saves the penalty kick (big surprise) with the entire stadium singing ‘La Marseillaise’.

Photo From: Onze, Issue 57, September 1980
(Sylvester Stallone after the crucial penalty kick save)

At this point the fans rush onto the field and hide the players and usher them to safety and THE END.
This was the first movie I saw as a full fledged soccer fan and as a ten year old, I was dazzled at seeing all those big name players as actors in a movie.
However, the adult in me would have frowned upon the utter lack of any surprise. 

Photo From: Onze, Issue 57, September 1980
(The Allies team with John Huston)



Saturday, July 4, 2015

New Addition: Politics and The Game, Part one

A new addition about social and Political events’ impact on the sport



1- The Falklands War and Osvaldo Ardiles
Argentina’s Osvaldo Ardiles was an idol for the fans at England’s Tottenham Hotspur fro many seasons. He had transfered there along with compatriot Ricardo Villa following the 1978 World Cup. He had been one of the rare foreign-born players to adapt to the British game.
The outbreak of the Falklands War in 1982 between his Nation and the United Kingdom forced him to leave England on patriotic grounds.
He was loaned to France’s Paris St. Germain at the start of the 1982/83 season.
In the middle of the season, with the political situation stable, he returned to Tottenham.

Photo From: Onze, Issue 81, September 1982
(Osvaldo Ardiles at Paris St. Germain, 1982/83)


2- Vittorio Pozzo at the 1938 World Cup
Pre-War Italy Manager Vittorio Pozzo used the politics of the day to his advantage to motivate his squad.
During the 1938 World Cup in France, he was well aware that many Italians that had fled Mussolini’s fascism had settled there.
Before Italy’s Opening match at Marseille vs. Norway on June 5, 1938 (Italy2 –Norway 1), he knew that some of the expatriate Italians in the Stadium would jeer the Italian national Anthem, specially the customary fascist salute.
He instructed his players to maintain their salute (their arms held up) until all the jeering and heckling had subsided. This way he believed he instilled in them patriotic fervor for the match.
It is unclear if he himself was a fascist, many observers do not believe so, though his methods and training regimen seemed dictatorial.


Photo From: La Nazionale Italiana, 1978
(Italy and Norway squads prior to the kick-off: June 5, 1938, World Cup, Italy 2-Norway 1)


Photo From: Azzurri, Storia della Nazionale di calcio tre volte campioni del Mondo, 1910-1983
(Vittorio Pozzo with the World Cup trophy,  June 19, 1938, World Cup, Italy 4-Hungary 2)


3- El Salvador and Honduras, Futbol War of 1969
It would be simplistic to say a Football match led to an all out war between two neighboring nations. One would have to extensively study the history of the nations and all the social and political events that led to it.
Following two World Cup qualifiers that each home nation won, a play-off in neutral Mexico City, on June 26, 1969,  was to decide who would qualify for the World Cup.
El Salvador won the match (3-2) and on the same day cut off all diplomatic ties with Honduras.
On July 14, 1969, the El Salvador Air Force started bombing Honduras.  On July 18th, the Organization of American States negotiated a cease-fire to end the conflict.


4- USSR and Chile, World Cup Qualifier, 1973
On November 21, 1973, Chile were to host USSR in a World Cup Qualifying playoff in Santiago’s Estadio Nacional.
The first leg in Moscow on September 26th had resulted in a scoreless tie.
On August 11, 1973, General Augusto Pinochet had assumed control of Chile following a Military Coup.
The Soviets refused to play Chile in that Stadium. They claimed that Pinochet’s regime had tortured and executed left leaning political prisoners in that same stadium following the Coup.
The match was forfeited and Chile qualified for the World Cup.
Chile was present at the field on matchday and scored after a mock kick-off.
Incidentally right after the farce ‘match’, Chile played a Friendly vs. Brazil’s Santos and lost 0-5.

Photo From: World Soccer, March 1974
(Chilean players during the mock kick-off, November 21, 1973)


5- Billy Bingham
Following the 1986 World Cup, Northern Ireland Manager was employed as a Manager in Saudi Arabia with Al Nassr.
He was still the Northern Ireland National Team manager, in addition to his management duties with Al Nassr.
On February 18, 1987, Northern Ireland were due to play a Friendly vs. Israel at Tel Aviv (1-1 tie.)
Due to obvious political reasons, he diplomatically did not manage Northern Ireland for that match. James Archibald Platt stood in for him.



Photo From: World Soccer, June 1993
(Billy Bingham)

Friday, June 12, 2015

New Addition: Tournaments-Part one

The 1976 American Bicentennial Soccer Cup


The American Bicentennial Soccer Cup was a summer tournament staged in the United States as a means of promoting Soccer in a fledgling Professional League.
The NASL (North American Professional Soccer League) had started in the 1960s and had over the years imported many big name players at the twilight of their careers (Pele, Bobby Moore, Eusebio, etc.) and also many mostly British based players.
This event staged in 1976, as part of the Nation’s Bicentennial Celebrations, grouped three former World Cup Champions (Brazil, Italy, England). Since the USA National team at the time could not compete Internationally with teams of such pedigree, the hosts decided to select a NASL XI squad that included Americans as well as many of the best foreign players in the League. The squad (called Team Amercia) would be managed by former English Professional and then New York Cosmos Manager Ken Furphy. He would be assisted with the Italian Eddie Firmani of Tampa Bay Rowdies and the German-born Manfred Schellscheidt of Hartford Bicentennials.
Osvaldo Brandão, who had taken over since the end of the 1974 World Cup, managed the Brazilians. He had previously managed the national team twenty years earlier.
He had selected a relatively young squad to prepare for the future. He had stated the team would form the basis for the 1978 World Cup. The team was led by veteran Roberto Rivellino, and still contained a handful of players (including Rivellino) who had taken part in the last World Cup: Emerson Leão, Marinho Chagas, Marco Antônio and Valdir Peres. Rivellino, Marco Antônio and Emerson Leão were 1970 World Cup Champions.
The previous year, Brandão had given debuts to Amaral and Roberto Dinamite. That year (1976) he had launched Gil, Falcão and Zico in the International Arena. Zico was being touted as Brazil’s next superstar and was even dubbed, the ‘White Pelé’.
Don Revie’s England had mostly their mind on the World Cup Qualifier vs. Finland in June at Helsinki, and saw these matches as preparation.
They had just taken part in the preceding weeks in the annual Home Championship with Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.
Revie had taken over in the Fall of 1974 and had overseen England’s European Championship elimination at the hands of Czechoslovakia. He still tinkered formations and tactics from match to match with no clear vision. The star of the team was Liverpool’s Kevin Keegan at his best.
Prior to the start of the Cup, Revie was faced with backup goalkeeper, Peter Shilton’s request to be omitted from England duty, as he was tired of being understudy to Ray Clemence (Though he would go back on his decision by August and ask to be reinstated).
Italy was also in a rebuilding phase after the disappointing 1974 World Cup and their elimination in the European Championships in a Group with Holland and Poland.
Fulvio Bernardini had led the team since the end the last World Cup. However, by September of 1975, Enzo Bearzot was appointed as the Manager with Bernardini acting at tandem as Technical Director. Bearzot’s handling of the national team was to be reassessed by the Italian Federation on June 30th; therefore he probably had more at stake in this Tournament than the other managers.
The team itself was based around the Turin axis of Juventus and Torino, who would go on to form the backbone up to the 1978 World Cup.
The Captain was still the Internazionale Milano veteran Giacinto Faccheti nearing the end of his career (almost 34 at the time). In addition, the midfield organizer was Fiorentina’s bright young hope Giancarlo Antognoni.
The matches started on May 23rd with the NASL stars hosting Italy at Washington, DC and Brazil and England squaring off in Los Angeles.


Photo From : Onze, Issue 6, June 1976
(Fabio Capello and Pele, May 23, 1976, Bicentennial Cup, Team America 0-Italy 4)

The NASL contingent was dealt with withdrawals of two its selected stars prior to the matches: Northern Ireland’s George Best and Englishman Rodney Marsh. They nevertheless fielded a squad captained by Pele, along with Bobby Moore and former Italian International Giorgio Chinaglia lining up vs. his own nation.
 For the Italians, Marco Tardelli was earning only his second cap. The Italians completely dominated and scored four unanswered goals.
In the 14th minute, Franco Causio got past Peter Chandler and crossed for Fabio Capello who scored. Seven minutes later, Paolino Pulici took and scored from a penalty kick awarded after a foul on himself by American goalkeeper Rigby. In the second half, Italy scored twice more. In the 73rd minute, Francesco Graziani pounced on a mistake by Stewart Jump. Ten minutes later, Francesco Rocca rounded out the scoring from a long distance shot.



Photo From : Onze, Issue 6, June 1976
(May 23, 1976, Bicentennial Cup, Brazil 1-England 0)


Photo From : Onze, Issue 6, June 1976
(Orlando, Keegan and Miguel, May 23, 1976, Bicentennial Cup, Brazil 1-England 0)

England and Brazil (Playing their first ever match on American soil) contest was a much tighter affair. The deadlock was only broken with a minute left. A corner taken from the left was headed across by Channon, Gil volleyed it across the goal, the ball struck an England defender and Roberto Dinamite struck the loose ball into the net from close range.
Many observers felt that England deserved at least a draw.

Photo From : World Soccer, August 1976
(May 23, 1976, Bicentennial Cup, Brazil 1-England 0)


The second day of matches took place on May 28th, with England and Italy playing in New York City and Brazil and the NASL squad at Seattle.
The Italy-England match-up was played in the Yankees Stadium.  The venue was later criticized, as it was an exclusively a Baseball field and for virtually half the field, the sandy Baseball Diamond was visible. The match had significance since both teams were grouped in the same World Cup Qualifying Group and were due to play one another later in the year (November 17th) at Rome.
The Englishmen Jimmy Rimmer, Ray Wilkins and Gordon Hill earned their first caps. Liverpool’s Phil Neal was earning his second cap. Revie did not lineup Gerry Francis, this gave an opportunity for Mick Channon to Captain England for the first time.
The Italians took an early two goal lead within the first twenty minutes. In the 15th minute, Mike Doyle lost a ball in midfield with Pulici pressuring him, the ball was picked up by Franco Causio who immediately passed to Graziani for the opener.
Three minutes later, Causio picked up another ball on the right wing and gave it to Capello, who then passed back for Benetti. Romeo Benetti crossed the ball across the goalmouth for Graziani to slot home for his personal second.
With England seemingly in shambles, Revie replaced goalkeeper Jimmy Rimmer and sent on Joe Corrigan for his very first cap as well.
Similarly, defender Phil Neal was replaced with the more experienced Mick Mills.
The more galvanized England not only reduced the deficit but also actually took the lead in the first six minutes of the restart.
First, in the 47th minute, Trevor Brooking crossed to Royle from the right side who picked the ball, turned and shot, Dino Zoff could not hold on and Channon knocked in the rebound.
A minute later, Gordon Hill took a corner from the right side that Thompson headed across and past Zoff.


Photo From : Onze, Issue 6, June 1976
(Francesco Rocca and Gordon Hill, May 28, 1976, Bicentennial Cup, England 3-Italy 2)

A few minutes later, Brooking sent a cross inside the box for Channon to score England’s winning goal.
With the match out of their control now, Bearzot made a triple substitution in the 57th minute, by taking off Roggi, Benetti and Causio and sending on Aldo Maldera, Renato Zaccarelli and Claudio Sala.
Near the end, Facchetti scored a goal, which was ruled out after a foul on Corrigan. The frustrated Facchetti allegedly punched Mick Mills in the chest and swung at Clements in the aftermath.
Enzo Bearzot dismissed the incident by claiming that this was behavior unlike him and that he was under a lot of pressure.
Bearzot went on to say that he was proud of his team because the sustained pressure they applied in the last twenty minutes. To him, this showed that they were a team of fighters. However, the media pushed back on that claim, by advancing the idea that the pressure was an act of desperation in a losing fight.
Bearzot also took issue with English Journalist Brian Glanville, who had ran a story alleging that Franco Causio had spat on Bearzot when being substituted. Bearzot said had that really happened, Causio would not have played the next match. Glanville for his part apologized, but maintained his version by saying he had interviewed three eyewitnesses. He later re-interviewed two of the witnesses and they maintained their account. One even said that not only Causio spat, but was so angry that he would not even shake hands with the player substituting him.


Photo From : Onze, Issue 6, June 1976
(Rivellino, May 28, 1976, Bicentennial Cup, Team America 0-Brazil 2)

The NASL-Brazil match on the same say was less eventful. Brazil won the match with two goals by Gil. The first in the 29th minute was a nice solo effort. Gil picked up a pass from Rivellino from the middle of the field and ran across towards the goal by dribbling and feigning a defender before taking a hard shot. 


Photo From : Onze, Issue 6, June 1976
(Gil scoring Brazil’s first goal, May 28, 1976, Bicentennial Cup, Team America 0-Brazil 2)

With a minute remaining, Roberto Dinamite passed to Zico, who received at the edge of the box, he took a shot that Martin parried, Gil picked up the rebound and scored from close range.
The last round of matches took place on May 31st. NASL/Team America took upon England at Philadelphia and Brazil and Italy played in the unofficial ‘Final’ at New Haven, Connecticut.
In the records of the England national team, the match vs. Team America is considered an unofficial match and the players did not receive official caps for this International.
In a one sided affair, England defeated their hosts with relative ease.


Photo From : Onze, Issue 6, June 1976
(Pele in front of Kevin Keegan, May 31, 1976, Bicentennial Cup, Team America 1-England 3)

Kevin Keegan scored twice in the first half, the first from an indirect free kick and the second six minutes later from a pass by Channon from the left after Bobby Smith had been dispossessed in midfield.
Early in the second half, England scored the third goal. Channon spotted Francis on the right side, who went around the goalkeeper and from a narrow angle scored. With minutes remaining, Chinaglia passed to Scullion who scored from near the edge of the box.


Photo From : Onze, Issue 9, September 1976
(Kevin Keegan, May 31, 1976, Bicentennial Cup, Team America 1-England 3)

The deciding match between Brazil and Italy was played with USA Secretary of State Henry Kissinger in the audience. The teams were presented to him before the start of the match, along with FIFA President Joao Havelange.
The match was a replay of the 1970 World Cup Final, with team captains Rivellino and Facchetti present once again. Italy’s Dino Zoff and Brazil’s Marco Antonio and Emerson Leão were also present in 1970 though did not play in that match.


Photo From : Onze, Issue 6, June 1976
(Rivellino and Giancarlo Antognoni, May 31, 1976, Bicentennial Cup, Brazil 4-Italy 1)

Italy scored first in the second minute. Franco Causio took a free kick from the left side touchline that got past Leão, as he was attempting to punch it clear, and Capello knocked it in.
Brazil tied up the match in the 29th minute. Rivellino, from his own half, sent a long pass to Lula on the left side touchline, who passed it across to Gil, who evaded Roggi and scored.
With minutes remaining to the end of the half, Capello was forced off injured after a foul by Gil. Pecci took Capello’s place. A few minutes later just before the half time whistle, the match turned into an ill-tempered affair with the first of three sending offs.
Lula was sent off after a violent foul on Pecci. In the next few minutes, there were protests and counter-protests from each side and Romeo Benetti had arguments with the Brazilian bench before he was taken aside.
Just like the 1970 Final, the score was 1-1 at halftime and just like the 1970 match the floodgates were opened in the second half.


Photo From : Onze, Issue 6, June 1976
(Zico, May 31, 1976, Bicentennial Cup, Brazil 4-Italy 1)

Though Brazil was a man down, they actually took control. Early in the second half, Gil scored Brazil’s second and his fourth overall. From his own half Rivellino sent a long cross to Gil on the right side, Gil got past Rocca and then dribbled past Facchetti in the box to score.
In the 62ns minute, the Italian substitute Eraldo Pecci was himself substituted due to an injury. Claudio Sala took his spot.
In the 66th minute, Roberto Bettega was sent off for a bad challenge on Marco Antonio.
Seven minutes later, Givanildo passed to Zico who ran clear and shot past Zoff.
Two minutes later, Getulio crossed into box for Roberto Dinamite, who trapped the ball first and then shot past Zoff for the fourth.
With seven minutes left, Franco Causio was sent off for kicking Rivellino from behind.
Despite the victory, Osvaldo Brandão resigned as Brazil Manager by the following year.
Zico had been a disappointment given the hype and expectations. Brandão singled out Rivellino as his best player for the Tournament.


Photo From: Azzurri, Storia della Nazionale di calcio tre volte campioni del Mondo, 1910-1983
(Falcao between Antognoni and Facchetti, May 31, 1976, Bicentennial Cup, Brazil 4-Italy 1)

For England, the positive performances did not turn out to be a springboard for future success, and they were eliminated by Italy in the qualification phase for the 1978 World Cup. By the next year, Don Revie himself was out as England boss under controversial circumstances.
Enzo Bearzot was eventually appointed as full time and sole Italy Manager by the Fall of 1977. He oversaw the fine Italy squad of the 1978 World Cup and more importantly won the 1982 World Cup in Spain with some of the players present on this tour (Zoff, Tardelli, Antognoni, Graziani and Causio).
He ended his managerial career a decade later also in North America (Mexico, 1986).
As far as Soccer in America, this Cup did not seem to have any effect in the long run. Within less than a decade the League had collapsed and there was no Professional League in America to speak off. The resurgence in American Soccer took place with hosting the 1994 World Cup that led to the creation of a Professional League (MLS-Major Soccer League) in 1996.


Bicentennial Cup Squads

Brazil:
Goalkeepers:
Emerson Leão (Sociedade Esportiva Palmeiras- São Paulo) 
Valdir de Arruda Peres ‘Valdir Peres’ (São Paulo Futebol Clube- São Paulo)  
Jairo do Nascimento  (Coritiba Futebol Clube –Curitiba)

Defenders:
Orlando Pereira (América Tio de Janieiro)  
Miguel Ferreira Pereira
(Fluminense Football Club- Rio de Janeiro)   
Rigoberto Costa  Beto Fuscão (Grêmio Foot-Ball Porto Alegrense) 
João Justino Amaral dos Santos (Guarani Futebol Clube)
Marco Antônio Feliciano (Club de Regatas Vasco da Gama - Rio de Janeiro)  
Francisco das Chagas Marinho Marinho Chagas (Botafogo de Futebol e Regatas- Rio de Janeiro
Getúlio Costa de Oliveira (Clube Atlético Mineiro- Belo Horizonte-Minas Gerais)
Antônio Dias dos Santos Toninho (Clube de Regatas Flamengo- Rio de Janeiro) 

Midfielders:
Paulo Roberto Falcão
(Sport Club Internacional- Porto Alegre)                  
Roberto Rivellino (Fluminense Football Club- Rio de Janeiro)   
Gilberto Alves Gil
(Fluminense Football Club- Rio de Janeiro)
Artur Antunes Coimbra Zico
(Clube de Regatas Flamengo- Rio de Janeiro) 
Givanildo José de Oliveira  (Santa Cruz Futebol Clube-Recife)  
Francisco Jesuino Avanzi Chicão (São Paulo Futebol Clube- São Paulo)  
Geraldo Cleofas Dias Alves (Clube de Regatas Flamengo- Rio de Janeiro)   

Strikers:
Antônio Rodrigues Filho Neca
(Grêmio Foot-Ball Porto Alegrense) 
Carlos Roberto de Oliveira Roberto Dinamite (Club de Regatas Vasco da Gama - Rio de Janeiro)  
Luis Ribeiro Pinto Neto
Lula (Sport Club Internacional- Porto Alegre)  
Gilberto Alves de Souza Flecha (Guarani Futebol Clube)
Enéas de Camargo  (Associação Portuguesa de Desportos – São Paulo) 


Coach: Osvaldo Brandão


England:
Goalkeepers:
Raymond Neal Clemence (Liverpool Football Club)
John James ‘Jimmy’ Rimmer  (Arsenal Football Club-London)
Joseph Thomas Corrigan (Manchester City Football Club)
Philip Benjamin Neil Frederick Parkes (Queen’s Park Rangers Football Club-London)
Peter Leslie Shilton (Stoke City Football Club) (withdrew from squad)

Defenders:
 Colin Todd (Derby County Football Club)
Michael Denis ‘Mick’ Mills (Ipswich Town Football Club)
Trevor John Cherry (Leeds United Association Football Club) 
Philip Bernard Thompson (Liverpool Football Club)
David Thomas Clement (Queen’s Park Rangers
Football Club-London)
Philip George Neal (Liverpool Football Club)
Thomas ‘Kevin’ Beattie (Ipswich Town Football Club)
Roy Leslie McFarland (Derby County Football Club)


Midfielders:
Brian Greenhoff (Manchester United Football Club)
Michael Doyle
(Manchester City Football Club)
Raymond Colin Wilkins (Chelsea Football Club-London)
Mark Anthony Towers  (Sunderland Association Football Club)
Trevor David Brooking (West Ham United Football Club-London)
Gerald Charles James ‘Gerry’ Francis
(cap) (Queen’s Park Rangers Football Club-London)
Raymond Kennedy (Liverpool Football Club)

Strikers:
Kevin Joseph Keegan (Liverpool Football Club)
Peter John Taylor (Crystal Palace Football Club-London)
Michael Roger Channon (Southampton Football Club) 
James ‘Stuart’ Pearson
(Manchester United Football Club)
Gordon Alec Hill  (Manchester United Football Club) 
Joseph Royle (Manchester City Football Club)
Charles Frederick ‘Charlie’ George (Derby County Football Club) 

Coach: Donald George Revie

Italy:
Goalkeepers:
Dino Zoff (Juventus Football Club-Torino)
Luciano Castellini (Torino Calcio 1906)
Paolo Conti (Associazione Sportiva Roma)

Defenders:
 
Moreno Roggi (Associazione Calcio Fiorentina-Firenze)
Marco Tardelli (Juventus Football Club-Torino)
Francesco Rocca (Associazione Sportiva Roma)
Aldo Maldera (Associazione Calcio Milan)
Mauro Bellugi (Bologna Football Club) 
Giacinto Facchetti (captain) (Internazionale Football Club- Milano)   
Claudio Gentile (Juventus Football Club-Torino)
Roberto Mozzini (Torino Calcio 1906)
Gaetano Scirea (Juventus Football Club-Torino) (withdrew from squad)

Midfielders:
Romeo Benetti (Associazione Calcio Milan)
Franco Causio (Juventus Football Club-Torino)         
Claudio Sala (Torino Calcio 1906)
Fabio Capello (Juventus Football Club-Torino)
Giancarlo Antognoni (Associazione Calcio Fiorentina-Firenze)
Renato Zaccarelli (Torino Calcio 1906)
Eraldo Pecci (Torino Calcio 1906)
Patrizio Sala (Torino Calcio 1906)

Strikers:
Francesco Graziani (Torino Calcio 1906)
Paolino Pulici (Torino Calcio 1906)
Roberto Bettega (Juventus Football Club-Torino)
Giuseppe Savoldi I (Societa Sportiva Calcio Napoli)


Coach: Enzo Bearzot
Technical Director: Fulvio Bernardini

The Original Italy pool of players included the following before final squad selection :
Felice Pulici (Società Sportiva Lazio-Roma (goalkeeper)
Graziano Bini  (Internazionale Football Club- Milano)   
Antonello Cuccureddu (Juventus Football Club-Torino)
Luigi Danova (Associazione Calcio Cesena)
Franco Peccenini (Associazione Sportiva Roma)
Giovanni Vavassori (Societa Sportiva Calcio Napoli)
Egidio Calloni (Associazione Calcio Milan)
Gianfranco Casarsa (Associazione Calcio Fiorentina-Firenze)
Domenico Caso (Associazione Calcio Fiorentina-Firenze)


Team America (NASL XI):
Goalkeepers:
Robert Rigby (New York Cosmos) (Nationality: USA)
Eric Martin (Washington Diplomats) (Nationality: Scotland)
Arnold Mausser (Tampa Bay Rowdies) (Nationality: USA)

Defenders:
Peter Chandler (Hartford Bicentennials)  (Nationality: USA)
Robert Smith (New York Cosmos) (Nationality: USA)
Stewart Jump (Tampa Bay Rowdies) (Nationality: England)
Keith Eddy (New York Cosmos)  (Nationality: England)
Mike England (Seattle Sounders) (Nationality: Wales)
Bobby Moore (San Antonio Thunder) (Nationality: England)
Bob McNabb (San Antonio Thunder) (Nationality: England)


Midfielders:
Dave Clements (New York Cosmos) (Nationality: Northern Ireland)
Juli Veee (San Jose Earthquakes) (Nationality: USA)
Stewart Scullion (Tampa Bay Rowdies) (Nationality: Scotland)
Tommy Smith (Tampa Bay Rowdies) (Nationality: England)
Ramon Mifflin (New York Cosmos) (Nationality: Peru)
Alex Skotarek (Chicago Sting)  (Nationality: USA)
Hank Liotart (Seattle Sounders) (Nationality: USA)
John Pedro (Rochester Lancers) (Nationality: Portugal)

Strikers:
Giorgio Chinaglia (New York Cosmos) (Nationality: Italy)
John Kowalik (Chicago Sting) (Nationality: Poland)
Edson Arantes do Nascimento ‘Pelé’ (Nationality: Brazil)
Steven David (Miami Toros) (Nationality: Trinidad and Tobago)
George Best (Los Angeles Aztecs) (Nationality: Northern Ireland) (withdrew before tournament)
Rodney Marsh (Tampa Bay Rowdies) (Nationality: England) (withdrew before tournament)

Head Coach: Ken Furphy
Coaches: Ed Firmani, Manfred Schellscheidt

The Original ‘Team America’ pool of players included the following before final squad selection :
Telmo Pires (Hartford Bicentennials)  (Nationality: USA)
Chris Lawler (Miami Toros) (Nationality: England)
Tom Galati (Philadephia Atoms)  (Nationality: USA)
Jose Berico (San Antonio Thunder) (Nationality: USA)
Al Trost (St Louis Stars)  (Nationality: USA)
Wolfgang Suhnholz (Boston Minutemen)  (Nationality: West Germany)
John Mason (Los Angeles Aztecs) (Nationality: USA)
Antonio Simoes (Boston Minutemen)  (Nationality: Portugal)
Kyle Rote Jr (Dallas Tornado) (Nationality: USA)
Mike Flater (Minnesota Kicks) (Nationality: USA)


1976 Bicentenial Cup Matches:


May 23, 1976- Los Angeles, California – Memorial Coliseum
Referee:  Hans-Joachim Weyland (West Germany)
Brazil 1-England 0   (Roberto Dinamite 89)
Brazil : 1-Leão, 2-Orlando, 3-Miguel, 4- Beto Fuscão, 5-Marco Antonio (15-Marinho Chagas 52nd), 6-Falcão, 7-Gil, 8-Zico, 9-Neca (19-Roberto Dinamite 46th), 10-Rivellino (captain), 11-Lula

England: 1-Ray Clemence, 2-Colin Todd, 3-Mick Mills, 4-Phil Thompson, 5-Mike Doyle, 6-Trevor Cherry, 7-Kevin Keegan, 8-Mick Channon, 9-Stuart Pearson, 10-Trevor Brooking, 11-Gerry Francis (captain)



May 23, 1976- Washington , D.C. (District of Columbia)-Robert Fitzgerald Kennedy Stadium      
Referee:  Walter Hungerbühler (Switzerland)
‘Team America’ 0-Italy 4 (Fabio Capello 15 , Paolino Pulici  22 pen-Francesco Graziani 72- Francesco Rocca 84)
Team America’ : 1-Bob Rigby, 2-Bob Smith, 3-Peter Chandler, 4-Keith Eddy, 5-Stewart Jump,6-Bobby Moore, 7-Stewart Scullion (Ramon Mifflin 72nd ) (Alex Skotarek 80th ), 8-Dave Clements, 9-Giorgio Chinaglia, 10-Pele (captain),11- John Kowalik (Steve David 50th )

Italy: 1-Dino Zoff, 2-Marco Tardelli, 3-Francesco Rocca, 5-Mauro Bellugi, 6-Giacinto Facchetti (captain) ,  4-Romeo Benetti, 7-Franco Causio (Claudio Sala 67th ), 8-Fabio Capello, 9-Francesco Graziani , 10-Giancarlo Antognoni (Renato Zaccarelli 67th ), 11-Paolino Pulici (Roberto Bettega 62nd )       
Other Subs:Luciano Castellini, Moreno Roggi




May 28, 1976- New York City- Yankees  Stadium
Referee:  Hans-Joachim Weyland (West Germany)
England 3-Italy 2  (Mick Channon 47,51, Phil Thompson 48 / Francesco Graziani 15, 18)
England: 1-Jimmy Rimmer (13-Joe Corrigan 46th), 2-David Clement, 3-Phil Neal (14-Mick Mills 46th), 4-Phil Thompson, 5-Mike Doyle, 6-Mark Towers, 7-Ray Wilkins, 8-Mick Channon (captain), 9-Joe Royle, 10-Trevor Brooking, 11-Gordon Hill
Other Subs: Trevor Cherry, Ray Kennedy, Peter Taylor

Italy:
1-Dino Zoff,  2-Moreno Roggi  (13-Aldo Maldera 57th ), 3-Francesco Rocca, 5-Mauro Bellugi, 6-Giacinto Facchetti (captain) ,  4-Romeo Benetti  (14-Renato Zaccarelli 57th ), 7-Franco Causio (15-Claudio Sala 57th ), 8-Fabio Capello, 9-Francesco Graziani, 10-Giancarlo Antognoni, 11-Paolino Pulici
Other Subs: Luciano Castellini, Roberto Bettega



May 28, 1976- Seattle, Washington - Kingdome Stadium
Referee:  Ramón Ivanoes Barreto Ruiz (Uruguay)
‘Team America’: 1-Eric Martin, 2-Bobby Smith, 5-Mike England, 6-Bobby Moore (Captain), 3-Stewart Jump, 8-Tommy Smith, 4-Keith Eddy, 10-Dave Clements,7-Stewart Scullion (12-Peter Chandler 85th ), 9-Giorgio Chinaglia, 11-John Kowalik (15-Juli Veee 56th )

Brazil: 1-Leão, 2-Orlando, 3-Miguel, 4- Beto Fuscão (14-Amaral 46th), 5- Marinho Chagas (13-Getulio 89th), 6-Falcão (15-Givanildo 67th), 7-Gil, 8-Zico, 9- Roberto Dinamite, 10-Rivellino (Captain), 11-Lula



May 31, 1976- Philadelphia , Pennsylvania-John Fitzgerald Kennedy Stadium   
Referee:  Walter Hungerbühler (Switzerland)
‘Team America’ 1-England 3  (Stewart Scullion 87 / Kevin Keegan 22,28, Gerry Francis 53)
 ‘Team America’:  1-Robert Rigby, 2-Bobby Smith, 3-Stewart Jump, 4-Keith Eddy, 5-Mike England  (14-John Kowalik ), 6-Bobby Moore (Captain), 7-Julie Veee  (12-Stewart Scullion 46th), 8-Tommy Smith, 9-Giorgio Chinaglia,10-Pelé, 11-Dave Clements  (16-Peter Chandler 50th)

England: 1-Ray Clemence, 2-Colin Todd (12-Michael Doyle 84th) , 3-Mick Mills, 4-Phil Thompson, 5- Brian Greenhoff, 6-Trevor Cherry, 7-Kevin Keegan (15-Peter Taylor 83rd), 8-Mick Channon, 9-Stuart Pearson, 10-Trevor Brooking, 11-Gerry Francis (captain)


May 31, 1976- New Haven, Connecticut- Yale Bowl Stadium
Referee:  Ramón Ivanoes Barreto Ruiz (Uruguay)
Brazil 4-Italy 1 (Gil 29, 52, Zico 73, Roberto Dinamite 75 / Fabio Capello 2)
Brazil :  1-Leão, 2-Orlando (13-Getulio 46th), 3-Miguel, 4-Amaral, 5-Marco Antonio (14- Beto Fuscão 80th), 6-Falcão (15-Givanildo 46th), 7-Gil, 8-Zico, 9-Roberto Dinamite, 10-Rivellino, 11-Lula
Booked: Rivellino
Sent off Lula 44th
Other Subs: 12-Valdir Peres, Flecha

Italy:
1-Dino Zoff, 2-Marco Tardelli, 3-Francesco Rocca, 5-Mauro Bellugi  (13-Moreno Roggi 46th), 6-Giacinto Facchetti (captain)  , 4-Romeo Benetti , 7-Franco Causio,  8-Fabio Capello  (14-Eraldo Pecci 41st ) (15-Claudio  Sala 62nd ), 9-Francesco Graziani , 10-Giancarlo Antognoni, 11-Paolino Pulici  (16-Roberto Bettega 46th) 
Sent off :Roberto Bettega 66th  , Franco Causio. 83rd
Other Subs: Luciano Castellini     


Final table              P   W   D   L  GF  GA  GD  Pts
1-Brazil                  3    3    0   0    7     1    +6       6
2-England              3     2    0    1    6     4    +2     4
3-Italy                    3     1    0    2    7     7     0      2
4-Team America    3     0    0    3    1     9    –8     0

P-Played, W-Win, D-Draw, L-Loss, GF-Goals For, GA-Goals Against, GD-Goal Difference, Pts-Points


Top Goalscorer-Gil (Brazil) 4 goals