Monday, September 19, 2016

Teams on Tour-Part 6 (England’s South American Tour of 1984)

England’s South American Tour of 1984

When England embarked on its South American Tour in the Summer of 1984, the knives had been out for quite some time for National Team Manager Bobby Robson.
For the English, they should have been in France (and not South America) in June 1984, competing in the Euros. Instead Robson was seen as the responsible party in their elimination against the surprising Danes. The home defeat at Wembley in September 1983 had spelled doom for England and Robson. Of course, with historical perspective being eliminated by the best Danish squad in history was no cause for humiliation.
But not for the English who had expected nothing short of qualification after a positive showing at the 1982 World Cup.
Former Ipswich Town Manager Bobby Robson had taken over the squad and began the rebuilding process of the post Keegan/Brooking era.
Their form in the new year 1984 had also left a lot to be desired. They had lost to France (0-2) and even Wales. In the weeks prior to their Tour they had managed a tie with Scotland (1-1) and a another rare loss at Wembley vs. USSR (0-2) on June 2nd.
At this point Robson was extremely unpopular as England Boss and many were openly clamoring for the appointment of Nottingham Forest Manager Brian Clough.
Many critics had also wanted new younger players to be tried out, as the veterans were not delivering at the highest level.
England had last toured South America in the summer of 1977 with a whole different generation.
For this Tour, they were to face Brazil, Uruguay and Chile in the space of a week.
Of course under normal circumstances Argentina would have been one of their opponents. But the Falklands War was in recent memory (just two years prior); as a result this encounter had logically not been figured in the planning.
Many England regulars were missing for various reasons for this Tour. These included Terry Butcher, Glenn Hoddle, Viv Anderson, Trevor Francis, Paul Mariner and Luther Blisset.
Robson chose many young and inexperienced players to gain experience.
He selected Mark Hateley (still a Second Division player at Portsmouth), John Barnes, Terry Fenwick, Mike Duxburry, Mark Chamberlain, Simon Stainrod and Clive Allen.
They started their Tour against Brazil at Maracana on June 10th
The new temporary Manager Edu Antunes (Brother of Zico) had promised attacking soccer after the defensive reign of Carlos Alberto Parreira in 1983.
However, this squad turned out to be a poor experimental squad lacking many of the big name players (Zico, Socrates, Falcao, Cerezo, Eder, etc..). Only Flamengo defenders Junior and Leandro remained from the superb 1982 Tele Santana led squad, as well as the fading veteran striker of 1978 (and 1982 reserve) Roberto Dinamite.
Robson decided to field a more attacking formation and chose Barnes and Chamberlain as wingers. According to Robson: ‘I wanted some imagination’.
International debuts were also given to Dave Watson in defense and as a second half substitute to QPR striker Clive Allen.


Photo From: Official Match Programme,  England v German Democratic Republic, 1984
(England squad, June 10, 1984, Brazil 0-England 2)

Photo From: Placar, Issue 734, June 15, 1984
(Assis, June 10, 1984, Brazil 0-England 2)

Brazil began the match by attacking and had chances through Renato and Zenon to take the lead.
Gradually England got into the game with Bryan Robson and Ray Wilkins taking over the midfield.
Of course this match has entered the English Football folklore for John Barnes’ excellent solo goal. The move started just before halftime, when Hateley from the center crossed for Barnes on the left side touchline. Barnes picked up the ball and went on his run and scored the most famous goal of his career. So impressive was his goal that even the local fans applauded him.


Photo From: Official Match Programme,  England v German Democratic Republic, 1984
(Bryan Robson and Renato, June 10, 1984, Brazil 0-England 2)

Photo From: World Soccer, May 1990
(John Barnes scoring his solo goal, June 10, 1984, Brazil 0-England 2)

Photo From: ondial, new series, issue 55, October 1984
(Tato, June 10, 1984, Brazil 0-England 2)

With the Brazilians not offering much in reply, England doubled the lead in the 62nd minute. Ray Wilkins sent a cross from his own half that reached Woodcock who laid it on for Barnes. His cross from the left side found Hateley who headed it in.
The match ended with the English enjoying a rare win at Rio vs. Brazil (albeit a weakened one).

Photo From: Placar, Issue 734, June 15, 1984
(June 10, 1984, Brazil 0-England 2)

Photo From: Placar, Issue 734, June 15, 1984
(June 10, 1984, Brazil 0-England 2)

Photo From: Onze-Mondial, Issue 65, June 1994
(Brazil squad, June 10, 1984, Brazil 0-England 2)

This match changed the lives of both goalscorers. Some feel it may have actually affected Barnes in a negative way, as he always had to live up to this goal for the rest of his career.
The other goalscorer Mark Hateley earned a transfer to AC Milan out of it. Ray Wilkins had just joined AC Milan from Manchester United. The morning after the match, he received a phone call from AC Milan officials who wanted him to ask Hateley about a possible trasnfer (which he did).

Photo From: Official Match Programme,  England v German Democratic Republic, 1984
(June 10, 1984, Brazil 0-England 2)

Photo From: Official Match Programme,  England v German Democratic Republic, 1984
(John Barnes after scoring, June 10, 1984, Brazil 0-England 2)

Photo From: Official Match Programme,  England v German Democratic Republic, 1984
(Goalscorers John Barnes and Mark Hateley, June 10, 1984, Brazil 0-England 2)

Uruguay Manager Omar Borras also watched this match from the stands.
He must have remarked that Brazil were not that physical and prepared his tactical plans accordingly for the encounter at Montevideo on June 13th.
The turn-out (about 40,000) was lower than expected since there had been terrorist threats from Anti-Britain Groups.
Uruguay were without their new star Enzo Francescolli who was not released by River Plate.


Photo From: World Soccer, August 1984
(Mike Duxbury and Acosta, June 13, 1984, Uruguay 2-England 0)

Photo From: World Soccer, August 1984
(June 13, 1984, Uruguay 2-England 0)

England started with virtually the same lineup as the Brazil match. The only change was in attack, where Clive Allen started in place of Woodcock.
Uruguay marked the English closer than the Brazilians and were more physical.
Uruguay’s Daniel Martinez fouled Chamberlian constantly during the match, while Montelongo had Barnes in check.
Uruguay took the lead in the eighth minute after a harsh penalty decision given for a foul by Hateley on Acosta. It was more of a 50-50 ball rather than a foul but the Referee pointed to the spot and Acosta gave Uruguay the lead.
England striker Clive Allen, in his first start, had a poor game and missed many chances for England.
At halftime, the hosts showed poor gamesmanship by waiting for five extra minutes before coming back out at halftime.


Photo From: Official Match Programme,  England v German Democratic Republic, 1984
(June 13, 1984, Uruguay 2-England 0)

Photo From: Mondial, new series, issue 65, August 1985
(Uruguay squad, June 13, 1984, Uruguay 2-England 0)

In the 68th minute, Uruguay doubled its lead through Cabrera. Montelongo crossed fron the right side, Cabrera controlled it in the box and shot past Shilton.
Bobby Robson described Uruguay’s attacking as the best he had seen as England Manager.
On July 17th at Santiago, Chile hosted England in their final match of the Tour in front of a dismal crowd of 10,000.
England started with the same lineup as the Uruguay match. It turned out to be a disappointing match that England should have won but ended scoreless. Many felt perhaps England did not exert themselves as they believed Chile to be their weakest opponent on the Tour.
On paper it certainly should have been, since this was essentially Chile’s Olympic side in preparation for the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics.
England were generally in control but could not find a breakthrough. Chile goalkeeper Roberto Rojas had an outstanding match and was responsible for keeping Chile in the match (five years later he would be implicated in the scandal where he feigned an injury against Brazil in a World Cup Qualifier/ the Firecracker incident).
For England, once again Wilkins and Bryan Robson stood out for their hard work in midfield.

Photo From: World Soccer, June 1990
(June 17, 1984, Chile 0-England 0)

Chile mostly defended and their Manager Isaac Carrasco felt this was the only way not to be overrun by the English.
Ray Wilkins felt if they had scored one goal, they could have gone on and scored 10. Winger Mark Chamberlain explained his poor output due to exhaustion.
At the post -match reception England met Jorge Robledo, the Chilean star who played for Newcastle United in the 1950s.


Photo From: Official Match Programme,  England v German Democratic Republic, 1984
(Team captains Bryan Robson  and Alejandro Hisis, June 17, 1984, Uruguay 2-England 0)

Photo From: World Soccer, September 1984
(June 17, 1984, Chile 0-England 0)

Many have looked upon this Tour as the turning point in Bobby Robson’s England reign.
Objectively, not much could be analyzed from England’s performances because none of the opponents were at full strength (most notably Brazil).
Nevertheless, the win vs. Brazil gave Robson and the Team much needed confidence, as many had predicted that a poor showing against them would have spelled the end of Robson’s time with England.
Robson was able to build upon the experience of this Tour to prepare the World Cup Qualifiers in the Fall of 1984.
England managed to score five goals (vs. Finland) and eight goals (vs. Turkey) in their first qualifiers to be on the driver’s seat. By the new year (1985), they had defeated Northern Ireland at Belfast (1-0, Hateley goal) to take a commanding lead. They would go through the qualifiers undefeated and perform in satisfactory fashion during the 1986 World Cup (undone only by the Hand and the Brilliance of Maradona).



The selected squad for the South American Tour:
Goalkeepers:
Peter Leslie Shilton (Southampton Football Club)
Christopher Charles Eric Woods (Norwich City Football Club)

Defenders:
Fenwick Terence William Fenwick (Queens Park Rangers Football Club-London)
Graham Paul Roberts (Tottenham Hotspur Football Club-London)
Gary Michael Stevens (Everton Football Club-Liverpool)
David Watson (Norwich City Football Club)
Michael Duxburry (Manchester United Football Club)
Kenneth Graham Sansom (Arsenal Football Club-London)

Midfielders / Strikers:
Bryan Robson (captain) (Manchester United Football Club)
Samuel Lee
(Liverpool Football Club)
Mark Valentine Chamberlain (Stoke City Football Club)
Raymond Colin Wilkins (Manchester United Football Club)
Simon Allan Stainrod (Queens Park Rangers Football Club-London)
John Charles Bryan Barnes (Watford Football Club)
David Armstrong  (Southampton Football Club) 
Stephen Kenneth Hunt (West Bromwich Albion Football Club)
Clive Darren Allen (Queens Park Rangers Football Club-London)
Anthony Stewart Woodcock (Arsenal Football Club-London) 
Mark Wayne Hateley (Portsmouth Football Club)

Coach: Robert William Robson




The Matches on Tour:

June 10, 1984- Rio de Janeiro - Estádio do Maracanã- Estádio Mário Filho
Attendance : 56,000
Referee:  Juan Daniel Cardelino (Uruguay)
Brazil 0-England 2 (John Barnes 43, Mark Hateley 62)
Brazil:
1-Roberto Costa Cabral ‘Roberto Costa’  (Club de Regatas Vasco da Gama - Rio de Janeiro)
2-José ‘Leandro’ de Souza Ferreira (Clube de Regatas Flamengo-
Rio de Janeiro)   (21-Wladimir Rodrigues dos Santos ‘Wladimir’ (Sport Club Corinthians Paulista- São Paulo) 65)
4-José Carlos Nepomuceno ‘Mozer’ (Clube de Regatas Flamengo-
Rio de Janeiro)
3-Ricardo’ Raimundo Gomes (Fluminense Football Club-
Rio de Janeiro)   
5-Leovegildo Lins GamaJúnior(Clube de Regatas Flamengo-
Rio de Janeiro)
6-José Sebastião Pires Neto ’Pires’
(Club de Regatas Vasco da Gama - Rio de Janeiro)
8-Zenon de Souza Farias ’Zenon’ (Captain) (Sport Club Corinthians Paulista-
São Paulo)
10-Benedito de Assis da Silva  ’Assis’  (Fluminense Football Club-
Rio de Janeiro)   
7-Renato Portaluppi  ‘Renato Gaúcho’  (Grêmio Foot-Ball Porto Alegrense)
9-Carlos Roberto de Oliveira ‘Roberto Dinamite’ 
(Club de Regatas Vasco da Gama - Rio de Janeiro)          (19-José ‘Reinaldo’ de Lima (Clube Atlético Mineiro- Belo Horizonte)  67)
11-Carlos Alberto de Araujo Prestes ’Tato’ (Fluminense Football Club-
Rio de Janeiro)   
Coach: Edu Antunes
Other Substitutes:
22- Paulo Victor Barbosa de Carvalho ‘Paulo Víctor’  (Fluminense Football Club- Rio de Janeiro)  
14-‘Baideck’ (Grêmio Foot-Ball Porto Alegrense) 
18- Mílton Queiroz da Paixão Tita’  (Clube de Regatas Flamengo- Rio de Janeiro)  

England: 1-Peter Shilton, 2-Mike Duxburry, 3-Kenny Sansom, 5-Dave Watson, 6-Terry Fenwick, 4-Ray Wilkins, 8-Mark Chamberlain, 7- Bryan Robson (captain), 11- John Barnes, 9- Mark Hateley, 10- Tony Woodcock (16-Clive Allen 76th)
Coach: Robert William Robson
Other Substitutes: 12- Gary M. Stevens, 13- Chris Woods, 14- Sammy Lee, 15- David Armstrong  




June 13, 1984- Montevideo- Estadio Centenario
Attendance : 40,000
Referee:  Lucio Gonzalez (Paraguay)
Uruguay 2-England 0 (Luis Alberto Acosta 8 pen, Wilmar Cabrera 68)
Uruguay:
1-Rodolfo Sergio Rodríguez (captain) (Santos Futebol Clube- Santos - São Paulo / Brazil)
4-Néstor Montelongo (Club Atlético Peñarol Montevideo) (14-Carlos Eduardo Vázquez (Club Atlético Bella Vista- Montevideo)  70)
2-Nelson Daniel Gutiérrez Luongo (Club Atlético Peñarol Montevideo)
3-Eduardo Mario Acevedo Cardozo (Defensor Sporting Club Montevideo)
6-Daniel Martínez (Danubio Futbol Club Montevideo)
5-Miguel Angel Bossio Bastianini (Club Atlético Peñarol Montevideo)
9-Wilmar Rubens Cabrera Sappa (Club Deportivo Los Millonarios- Santafé de Bogotá / Colombia)
8-Ricardo Javier Perdomo Moreira (Club Nacional de Football Montevideo)
7-Carlos Alberto Aguilera Nova (Club Nacional de Football Montevideo)
10-Juan Ramón Carrasco (Club Nacional de Football Montevideo) (16-José Luis Zalazar Rodriguez  (Club Atlético Peñarol Montevideo) 81st)
11-Luis Alberto Acosta Rodriguez (Montevideo Wanderers Football Club) (18-Ruben Sosa Ardaiz (Danubio Futbol Club Montevideo) 61st)
Coach: Omar Borras

England: 1-Peter Shilton, 2-Mike Duxburry, 3-Kenny Sansom, 5-Dave Watson, 6-Terry Fenwick, 4-Ray Wilkins, 8-Mark Chamberlain, 7- Bryan Robson (captain), 11- John Barnes, 9- Mark Hateley, 10- Clive Allen (16-Tony Woodcock 69th)


June 17, 1984- Santiago -Estadio Nacional
Attendance : 9,900
Referee:  Luiz Felix (Brazil)
Chile 0-England 0
Chile:
Roberto Antonio Rojas (Club Social y Deportivo Colo Colo-Santiago)
Hugo Tabilo (Club de Deportes Cobreloa –Calama)
Manuel Araya (Club de Deportes Cobresal -El Salvador)
Eduardo Gómez (Club de Deportes Cobreloa –Calama)
Luis Hormazábal (Club Social y Deportivo Colo Colo-Santiago)
Juan Soto Quintana (Club Deportes Naval de Talcahuano) (Luis Rodríguez (Corporación de Fútbol Profesional Universidad de Chile-Santiago) 35)
Alejandro Hisis (Club Social y Deportivo Colo Colo-Santiago)
Claudio Toro (Club Deportivo Magallanes-Santiago) (Eduardo Gino Cofré (Club de Deportes Santiago Wanderers -Valparaiso) 56)
Jorge Aravena (Club Deportivo Universidad Católica-Santiago)
Luis Venegas (Club Deportivo Magallanes-Santiago)
Juan Covarrubias (Club de Deportes Cobreloa –Calama) (Héctor Puebla (Club de Deportes Cobreloa –Calama) 66)
Coach: Luis Ibarra


England: 1-Peter Shilton, 2-Mike Duxburry, 3-Kenny Sansom, 5-Dave Watson, 6-Terry Fenwick, 4-Ray Wilkins, 8-Mark Chamberlain (Sammy Lee 74th), 7- Bryan Robson (captain), 11- John Barnes, 9- Mark Hateley, 10- Clive Allen 



References:
World Soccer, July 1984 (’Maracana upset brings Robson breathing space’ By Jonathan Shallard and Eric Weil)
England, The Complete Post-War Record, Author Mike Payne
World Soccer, August 1984 (‘England Stronger after South American Tour’ By Brian Glanville)
World Soccer, August 1984 (‘Three Poor Games but Uruguay happy with win’ By Eric Weil)
Placar, Issue 734, June 15, 1984
Three Lions on the Shirt, Author : Dave Bowler

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