Wednesday, June 22, 2016

New Addition: The Euros-Part one (1960 Edition)

Nowadays, the UEFA European Championships is after the World Cup, the most prestigious International Soccer Tournament on earth.
A far cry from its modest beginnings when many major European Nations snubbed it.
French Federation’s General Secretary, Henri Delaunay, conceived the original idea for this Tournament.

Photo From: Football Magazine, Issue 3, April 1960
(European nations Cup trophy)

He proposed the concept on February 5th, 1927. In its initial form this Tournament would take place every two years.
However, this idea was shelved as the FIFA members were in the process of launching the very first World Cup in 1930.
Delaunay’s idea was lost in the shadow of the first few World Cups, as well as the World War II.
It is important to note that while this idea had not taken hold, there was a semi-regular Tournament from the late 1920’s called the Dr. Gero Cup that involved Austria, Italy, Switzerland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia (and later Yugoslavia). This was seen as a precursor to the future Euros Tournament.
The idea of a European Cup inched closer as UEFA was formed in 1954 and Henri Delaunay became its first General Secretary.
Other proponents of his idea included Hungarian Manager Gustav Sebes and other administrators: Alfred Fey (Austria), Cosntantin Constantaras (Greece) and Dr. Ebbe Schwartz (Denmark).

Photo From: Onze-Mondial, Issue 128, September 1999
(Henri Delaunay)

Unfortunately, Delaunay did not get to realize his dream in his lifetime and passed away in 1955.
His idea was sanctioned on June 8th, 1958 in Stockholm, two days before the start of the World Cup.
This Tournament was to be called the European Cup of Nations. UEFA President Dr. Ebbe Schwartz proposed that this new trophy to be sub-titled as the ‘Henri Delaunay Trophy’ in homage of his memory.
This initial edition was to be held in 1960 in France. However, many Nations were still lukewarm to this new competition. This included major Footballing Nations such as England, Scotland West Germany, Italy, Belgium, Holland and Switzerland. In fact from UEFA’s 32 members only 17 accepted to participate.
Many believed Italy refused to participate since they felt their squad was too weak, as they had just been eliminated from qualifying to the 1958 World Cup by Northern Ireland.
The withdrawals gave this edition a more Eastern European feel as the entire Eastern bloc Nations (except Albania) gladly took part.
The series was to have a home and away elimination format with the Finals to be held in the host Nation France in July 1960.
On September 28, 1958, USSR and Hungary kicked off the very first Euros qualifiers in Moscow (3-1 USSR win). The Soviets won the return leg in Hungary (1-0) a year later.
Incidentally, a pre-Qualifying Round should have preceded this match between Republic of Ireland and Czechoslovakia, but this round took place in the following year and the much stronger Czechs advanced.
France destroyed Greece (7-1 at home) in the latter months of 1958, while Alfredo Di Stefano’s Spain easily defeated Poland home and away. Czechoslovakia continued its advance by defeating Denmark, while Austria eliminated Norway and Yugoslavia eliminated Bulgaria.
The Quarterfinals were to take place in the spring of 1960 just more than a month before the Finals.
Cold War Politics marred the matchup between Spain and USSR. Spain, under General Franco, had not had diplomatic relations with the Soviet Union since the onset of the Spanish Civil War in the 30s. Franco was at odds with the Soviets for their involvement in helping the opposition in that war.

Photo From: Football Magazine, Issue 3, April 1960
(A cartoon ahead of the USSR and Spain matchup that did not take place)

The Spanish Football Federation were willing for the matches to take place but they were vetoed by Franco who refused to grant visas to the Soviets. In the end the tie was awarded to the Soviets (3-0) since Spain refused to comply.
In the other ties, France defeated Austria home and away, as did Czechoslovakia to Romania. Yugoslavia after losing the first leg defeated Portugal by a heavy margin (5-1).
The Final Four was set with hosts France and three Eastern Bloc Nations (USSR, Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia).
The hosts France had been one of the emerging Nations with Europe who were hoping to build up on their Third place finish in the previous World Cup in Sweden.

Photo From: Football Magazine, Issue 7, August 1960
(France squad for the 1960 Euros)

They were managed by Albert Batteux but the ‘Selectionneur’ was Alex Thépot. He had come on board following the death of Paul Nicholas in a Traffic Accident the previous year. Many had hoped that Raymond Kopa’s transfer back to Reims in 1959 (from Real Madrid) would have made his availability for the National Team easier. However, the French were hampered by not only the absence through injury of Kopa, but his two Reims teammates and fellow 1958 heroes including top goalscorer Just Fontaine and Roger Piantoni. In addition experienced AS Monaco defender Raymond Kaelbel had to withdraw through injury.
Czechoslovakia were managed by Rudolf Vytlacil who emphasized on technique. The squad had the backbone of the squad that would finish runner-ups in the following World Cup in 1962 in Chile. These included Future Ballon d’Or winner Jozef Masopust, as well as goalkeeper Viliam Schrojf and defenders Ladislav Novák and Jan Popluhár.
The Yugoslavs were the youngest team of the series and were seen as an exciting technical side.
A committee consisting of Aleksandar Tirnanic, Ljubomir Lovric and Dragomir Nikolic managed them.
The offensive potential of the squad was exemplified by the likes of Drazen Jerkovic, Dragoslav Sekularac, Milan Galic and Borivoje Kostic.
Gavril Kachalin’s Soviets had been one of the rising teams of the continent with legendary goalkeeper Lev Yashin. They had been isolated for decades and were recent newcomers in the International arena.
They had won the 1956 Olympics and had reached the 1958 World Cp Quarterfinals.
The Euros kicked off with a doubleheader on July 6th. The Hosts France taking on Yugoslavia at Paris and USSR taking on Czechoslovakia at Marseille.
In what turned out to be s see-saw match, Yugoslavia took the lead in the 11th minute in front of a Parisian crowd of less than 27,000. Just a minute later, Jean Vincent (one of the heroes of 1958) tied the match for France.
Just before halftime François Heutte gave France the lead. Early in the second half, Maryan Wisnieski gave France s (3-1) lead, but Ante Zanetic reduced the deficit a few minutes later.


Photo From: France Football Hors-Série - Les Bleus et l’Euro - 2016
(France’s François Heutte, July 6, 1960,  European Nations’ Cup, France 4-Yugoslavia 5)

Photo From: France Football Hors-Série - Les Bleus et l’Euro - 2016
(Jean Vincent and Branko Zebec, July 6, 1960,  European Nations’ Cup, France 4-Yugoslavia 5)

 In the 62nd minute, François Heutte once again gave France a two-goal cushion (4-2) with a controversial goal. Heutte was in an offside position and the linesman raised his flag. The Yugoslav players stopped and Heutte himself believed the play was dead and just went ahead and scored without conviction  (nowadays he would have been booked for continuing play after such a call).


Photo From: Football Magazine, Issue 7, August 1960
(July 6, 1960,  European Nations’ Cup, France 4-Yugoslavia 5)

Photo From: L’Equipe, L’Equipe de France de Football, la Belle Histoire
(Soskic making a save, July 6, 1960,  European Nations’ Cup, France 4-Yugoslavia 5)

To everyone’s disbelief the match referee, the Belgian Gaston Grandain validated the goal despite Yugoslavian protests.
The match seemed done and dusted and appeared beyond Yugoslavia’s grasp.
However, this match has gone down in the annals of French Soccer History as the match that France lost due to the many errors of the nervous OGC Nice goalkeeper Georges Lamia. In three minutes (from the 75th to the 78th minute), Yugoslavia scored unanswered goal from Tomislav Knez and Drazen Jerkovic (two goals) to take a (5-4) lead.
For the technical Yugoslavs, Sekularac and Perusic had been able to dictate the play with Kostic and Jerkovic also standing out.

Photo From: Football Magazine, Issue 7, August 1960
(Lamia at the end of the match with ball boys, July 6, 1960,  European Nations’ Cup, France 4-Yugoslavia 5)

France Selectionneur Alex Thépot admitted that he had made tactical errors.
Experienced defender Robert Jonquet had been rested, in the hopes that he would be fresh for the Final. In his place, France had gambled on the inexperienced Robert Herbin. This turned out to be an error, as Herbin’s Youth could not compensate Jonquet’s leadership. Thepot would state that Herbin was not yet a leader in the defense.
Lamia felt that he was wrongfully scapegoated and personally accepted culpability only for the second goal. He felt he was blameless for the last three goals and felt the defense should share some of the blame. He believed with the experience of Kaelbel and Jonquet, France would have never conceded five goals in such an important match.
On the same day, at Marseille’s Stade Velodrome, the Soviets defeated Czechoslovakia (3-0) to book their place in the Final vs. Yugoslavia.
Valentin Ivanov scored twice, though the second appeared offside.

Photo From: Football Magazine, Issue 7, August 1960
(Valentin Ivanov, July 6, 1960,  European Nations’ Cup, USSR 3-Czechoslovakia 0)

It was not a match of pleasant quality, but the more athletic Soviets dominated with their collective play.
Despite the three goals conceded, Czechoslovakia goalkeeper Schroif played well, as did Popluhar and Bubernik.
Yashin was as expected excellent in the Soviet goal. At the end of the match some French fans entered the field and carried him over their shoulders.

Photo From: Football Magazine, Issue 7, August 1960
(Schroif making a save, Ponodelnik on the left, July 6, 1960,  European Nations’ Cup, USSR 3-Czechoslovakia 0)

A demoralized France squad took the field at Marseille for the Third place match vs. Czechoslovakia.
There was such lack of interest for this match that the audience was unbelievably less than 10,000.
The unimportance of this match could perhaps explain in the tame displays in view.
In some ways this could explain why in time, third place matches were outright disbanded for the Euros.
Georges Lamia was dropped after his nightmarish match vs. Yugoslavia. Jean Taillandier started in the net. Robert Jonquet was restored back in the lineup, however, his error led to Czechoslovakia’s first goal in the 58th minute.


Photo From: Football Magazine, Issue 7, August 1960
(Popluhar and Stivenard, July 9, 1960,  European Nations’ Cup, France 0-Czechoslovakia 2)

Photo From: L’Equipe, L’Equipe de France de Football, la Belle Histoire
(Schroif making a save in front of Stievenard, July 9, 1960,  European Nations’ Cup, France 0-Czechoslovakia 2)

The Czechs scored a second goal near the end to cap off a miserable and forgettable Tournament for the hosts.
In this match, the French were outright catastrophic. In addition, the home crowd was against them.  The Marseille crowd jeered every French error.
Alex Thépot described this as France’s worst match in 30 years, while Albert Batteux could not understand why the Marseille audience taunted the home team by chanting ‘Allez l’OM’.
France walked off the field in a chorus of boos.

Photo From: Football Magazine, Issue 7, August 1960
(Masopust and Douis, July 9, 1960,  European Nations’ Cup, France 0-Czechoslovakia 2)


Photo From: Football Magazine, Issue 7, August 1960
(France’s Heutte and Wisnieski leaving the field dejected, July 9, 1960,  European Nations’ Cup, France 0-Czechoslovakia 2)

Many blamed France’s poor displays due to the absence of Kopa, Fontaine, Piantoni and Kaelbel. Others pointed out the calendar, saying that the month of July was not meant for Football.
If France had been planning to build up on the success of 1958, it had been a fiasco.
The following day, at Paris’ Parc des Princes, the very first Final of the Euros took place in all Eastern Bloc affair between the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia.
Once again the crowd was poor, less than 18,000, mainly due to the rain and the absence of the hosts.

Photo From: Onze-Mondial, Issue 128, September 1999
(July 10, 1960,  European Nations’ Cup, USSR 2-Yugoslavia 1)

It was a match that showcased the contrast in styles, the young and exciting and more talented Yugoslavs against the more physical Soviets.
Yugoslavia dominated for long spells and took the lead before halftime through Galic. Had it not been for the excellence of Yashin in the goal, the Yugoslavs would have built a larger lead.  He was by far the man of the match.


Photo From: Football Magazine, Issue 7, August 1960
(Miladinovic and Bubukin, July 10, 1960,  European Nations’ Cup, USSR 2-Yugoslavia 1)

Photo From: Football Magazine, Issue 7, August 1960
(July 10, 1960,  European Nations’ Cup, USSR 2-Yugoslavia 1)

In fact both goalkeepers Yashin and Yugoslavia’s Blagoje Vidinic shone in this match.
It was an intense match, full of action and opportunities from both sides.
Just after halftime, the Soviets got back into the game and tied through Slava Metrevelli. Despite pressure from both sides the match remained a stalemate and went into extra time.
This favored the more physical Soviets and finally all the pressure paid off and they scored a second goal in the 114th minute through Viktor Ponedelnik.
The Soviets became the first victors of the European Nations Cup.



Photo From: Football Magazine, Issue 7, August 1960
(USSR’s Lev Yashin, July 10, 1960,  European Nations’ Cup, USSR 2-Yugoslavia 1)

Photo From: Calcio 2000, Issue 22, August 1999
(USSR captain Igor Netto collecting the trophy, July 10, 1960,  European Nations’ Cup, USSR 2-Yugoslavia 1)

This initial experiment had not been the grand success that many would have envisioned. The attendances were poor and would remain so for some time.
But there was enough to entice all the absentees to particpate in the future editions, as the competition definitely needed the major Nations.
In time, standards and interest would grow one Tournamnet after another.
Fifty-six years later Henri Delaunay’s dream has become even bigger than he might have imagined back in 1927.

Photo From: Спортивные игры (Sport Games) 1960.zip
(A cartoon showing Gavril Kachalin and Igor Netto leaving Paris with the Euroepan Championship trophy)


Note:
1-Gabriel Hanot, the Editor of L’Equipe selected the team of the Tournamant as follows:
Lev Yashin (USSR), Ladislav Novak (Czechoslovakia), Jovan Miladinovic (Yugoslavia), Fahrudin Jusufi (Yugoslavia), Titus Bubernik (Czechoslovakia), Ante Zanetic (Yugoslavia), Slava Metrevelli (USSR), Drazen Jerkovic (Yugoslavia), Milan Galic (Yugoslavia), Valentin Bubukin (USSR), Dragoslav Sekularac (Yugoslavia)


Photo From: (Magazine Source unknown) / Contribution From a blog viewer
(USSR squad, July 10, 1960,  European Nations’ Cup, USSR 2-Yugoslavia 1)


References:
Calcio 2000, Issue 22, August 1999 (‘Vento Dell’Este’ By Vincenzo Barreca)
Onze-Mondial, Issue 128, September 1999 (‘La Montangne Russe’ By Nicolas Gettliffe)
Football Magazine, Issue 3, April 1960 (‘Le Roman Vrai de la Premiere Coupe d’Europe des Nations’ By Jean Gaillard)
Football Magazine, Issue 3, April 1960 (‘Yougoslavie: la Nouvelle Vague bat tous les records’ By Petar Stevcic)
Football Magazine, Issue 3, April 1960 (‘U.R.S.S.: Le Football le plus massif du monde’ By Beknazar Youzbachev)
Football Magazine, Issue 3, April 1960 (‘Tchecoslovaquie: Le Football Anglais a l’heure d’Europe Centrale’ By Victor Sinet)
Football Magazine, Issue 7, August 1960 (Match Reports)
Football Magazine, Issue 7, August 1960 (Gabriel Hanot a forme l’equipe de la Coupe d’Europe)
Football Magazine, Issue 7, August 1960 (Jacques de Rhyswick dresse un bilan inquoetant pour le football Francais’)
World Soccer, June 1992 (‘History of the European Nations’ Cup’ By John Kelly)
France Football Hors-Série - Les Bleus et l’Euro – 2016  (By Arnaud Tulipier)
L’Equipe, L’Equipe de France de Football, la Belle Histoire

1 comment:

  1. What I would like to say about your post is that you only need to have a look, at first glance, you understand how hard people have worked to write your post, you have not put any useless content at all. . Wrote my post in beautiful words.
    independent call girls in gurugram
    India
    Escorts Servcie Sector 31
    i love kashmir
    gurugram girls
    Call Girls In Gurugram
    Real Call Girls Gurugram
    Escorts Service in Gurugram
    call girls in Dwarka
    Gurugram escort service

    ReplyDelete